POLICY

Minister sets legal measures on food estates in unforested protection forests
November 18, 2020

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JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya has pointed out that when President Joko Widodo took office in October 2014, the size of the country's protection forests (HL) with unforested land cover stood at around 5.6 million hectares, equal to nearly 10 times the size of Bali. 

This figure, she emphasized, accounted for nearly 19% of the total area of protection forests, amounting to nearly 30 million hectares or 1.2 times the size of the UK.

According to Minister Nurbaya, President Widodo ordered the environmental recovery and rehabilitation - by means of agroforestry, sylvopasture and sylvofishery through food estate development-based activities - of unforested protection forests that no longer fully meet the criteria of having a protective function.

“The legal corridor used involves social forestry and agrarian reforms, not the relinquishment of protection forests for food estate development purposes,” Minister Nurbaya explained in a legal and policy discussion (Nov 17) on her ministerial regulation which was promulgated in early November this year.  

She said that ground-based evidence shows that major parts of unforested protection forests are home to community farms that must be legally protected rather than uprooted.

“The essence of President Widodo's order is that community farms which have operated for decades must have legal certainty through social forestry and agrarian reforms. This is the legal solution,” she asserted. 

The following graphs presented by Minister Nurbaya depict the extent of unforested and forested protection forests from 2000-2019. Almost all of the unforested protection forests came into existence before President Widodo took office. These areas are the subject of restoration and rehabilitation efforts through social forestry and agrarian reforms, including food estate development programs.



Strict legal measures

Minister Nurbaya explained that proposals to obtain the provision of unforested protection forests must originate from government institutions, from the ministerial level to local authorities, and not direct proposals from community groups, business entities or other relevant stakeholders. 

“The government is driving the acceleration of the implementation of these programs. Responsibility and accountability lie with the government. Government expenditures have proven to be the only driving factor in economic growth during this global pandemic,” she said. 

She also underlined that community-based tree planting programs are among the key efforts prioritized for the environmental recovery of unforested protection forests which are classified as areas that must be rehabilitated.

“We are encouraging investment to support community-based tree planting in unforested protection forests through various activities, such as agroforestry and community-based food estates,” she added. 

“However, these unforested protection forests are not directly allocated to the private sector, but are specified for farmer groups. Nonetheless, there are opportunities for business partnerships and investments between companies and farmer groups, for example in terms of off-takers, joint management, whose accountability is controlled by the government,” Minister Nurbaya elaborated. 

She also re-emphasized that proposals to operate in unforested protection forests are not allowed to be made directly by farmer groups or companies, but form part of requests from government agencies related to their legal responsibility towards protection forests. 

“The ultimate goal is to strengthen the protective function of protection forests at the landscape level in the corridor of social forestry and agrarian reforms, as well as to involve public and private investments with strict measures,” she affirmed.

Minister Nurbaya stressed that it is “not natural forests spread among protection forests which will be cleared for food estate development.”

In addition to its protection forests, spanning an area 1.2 times the size of the UK, more than 80% of which is still forested, Indonesia is also home to conservation areas covering an area of more than 27 million hectares, larger than the UK.


TAGS: FOOD ESTATE , SOCIAL FORESTRY , AGRARIAN REFORMS

RELATED STORIES


POLICY

Minister sets legal measures on food estates in unforested protection forests
November 18, 2020

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya has pointed out that when President Joko Widodo took office in October 2014, the size of the country's protection forests (HL) with unforested land cover stood at around 5.6 million hectares, equal to nearly 10 times the size of Bali. 

This figure, she emphasized, accounted for nearly 19% of the total area of protection forests, amounting to nearly 30 million hectares or 1.2 times the size of the UK.

According to Minister Nurbaya, President Widodo ordered the environmental recovery and rehabilitation - by means of agroforestry, sylvopasture and sylvofishery through food estate development-based activities - of unforested protection forests that no longer fully meet the criteria of having a protective function.

“The legal corridor used involves social forestry and agrarian reforms, not the relinquishment of protection forests for food estate development purposes,” Minister Nurbaya explained in a legal and policy discussion (Nov 17) on her ministerial regulation which was promulgated in early November this year.  

She said that ground-based evidence shows that major parts of unforested protection forests are home to community farms that must be legally protected rather than uprooted.

“The essence of President Widodo's order is that community farms which have operated for decades must have legal certainty through social forestry and agrarian reforms. This is the legal solution,” she asserted. 

The following graphs presented by Minister Nurbaya depict the extent of unforested and forested protection forests from 2000-2019. Almost all of the unforested protection forests came into existence before President Widodo took office. These areas are the subject of restoration and rehabilitation efforts through social forestry and agrarian reforms, including food estate development programs.



Strict legal measures

Minister Nurbaya explained that proposals to obtain the provision of unforested protection forests must originate from government institutions, from the ministerial level to local authorities, and not direct proposals from community groups, business entities or other relevant stakeholders. 

“The government is driving the acceleration of the implementation of these programs. Responsibility and accountability lie with the government. Government expenditures have proven to be the only driving factor in economic growth during this global pandemic,” she said. 

She also underlined that community-based tree planting programs are among the key efforts prioritized for the environmental recovery of unforested protection forests which are classified as areas that must be rehabilitated.

“We are encouraging investment to support community-based tree planting in unforested protection forests through various activities, such as agroforestry and community-based food estates,” she added. 

“However, these unforested protection forests are not directly allocated to the private sector, but are specified for farmer groups. Nonetheless, there are opportunities for business partnerships and investments between companies and farmer groups, for example in terms of off-takers, joint management, whose accountability is controlled by the government,” Minister Nurbaya elaborated. 

She also re-emphasized that proposals to operate in unforested protection forests are not allowed to be made directly by farmer groups or companies, but form part of requests from government agencies related to their legal responsibility towards protection forests. 

“The ultimate goal is to strengthen the protective function of protection forests at the landscape level in the corridor of social forestry and agrarian reforms, as well as to involve public and private investments with strict measures,” she affirmed.

Minister Nurbaya stressed that it is “not natural forests spread among protection forests which will be cleared for food estate development.”

In addition to its protection forests, spanning an area 1.2 times the size of the UK, more than 80% of which is still forested, Indonesia is also home to conservation areas covering an area of more than 27 million hectares, larger than the UK.


TAGS: FOOD ESTATE , SOCIAL FORESTRY , AGRARIAN REFORMS

RELATED STORIES