POLICY

Minister: Orangutan protection incorporated into Indonesia’s FOLU climate target
March 10, 2022

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JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya has reiterated that ongoing and consistent conservation and protection efforts focused on Indonesia's flagship species, including the Sumatran, Tapanuli and Bornean orangutans, form part of the packages in the country's 2030 Forestry and Other Land Use (FOLU) net carbon sink target.

President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo and Minister Nurbaya brought Indonesia’s legally-binding climate targets to last year’s COP26 summit, including the 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target which aligns with the pledge made by world leaders at the 2021 UN climate summit.

The Indonesia’s FOLU climate target is equivalent to global efforts to achieve net zero deforestation by 2030.

"Our 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target serves as a large umbrella for the forestry and land use sector, while conservation and protection efforts for flagship species across the islands of Sumatra, Kalimantan and Java are among the packages in the FOLU climate target," said Minister Nurbaya in a policy discussion regarding the clear links between Indonesia's FOLU climate target and its flagship species conservation strategy (Mar 8).

“Don’t forget that the Indonesian state budget apportions over USD300 million annually for our climate efforts, which are linked, among other things, to meeting the 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target while, in parallel, making sure of the ongoing conservation and protection of our flagship species, especially on the ground level," she explained.

The minister also re-emphasized that Indonesia remains extremely optimistic and confident about ensuring the conservation and protection of its flagship species.

“Threats to flagship species of course still exist, so our efforts are directed at keeping these threats at a very low risk level so that the major habitats of our flagship species continue to allow their populations to thrive,” she stressed.

Indonesia is second to none as the home of numerous flagships species, whose conservation and protection continue to be prioritized during the global pandemic by the country's forestry authorities, both through satellite monitoring and ground-based efforts, as reported by FORESTHINTS.NEWS in late November last year.

The recent photos below depict wild Bornean orangutans, one of Indonesia's flagship species, populations of which are spread across conservation areas and protection forests, as well as in production forests (logging, pulpwood and ecosystem restoration concessions), including HCV areas that lie in palm oil concessions. Indonesia is home to both the largest habitat area and population of Bornean orangutans in the world.





Own resources

Minister Nurbaya said despite the fact that the climate finance pledge of USD100 billion a year which was promised years ago by developed countries has never come to fruition, Indonesia’s climate efforts continue unabated, encompassing wide-ranging endeavours to conserve and protect the country’s various flagship species.

"Over USD300 million a year from our own state budget is allocated to our FOLU climate efforts, including the conservation and protection of flagship species. That's not just a pledge or promise," she stated.

“Without our own budget power, of course we wouldn’t be able to work seriously in reaching our climate targets, including persevering with conservation and protection efforts to the benefit of the flagship species. Our climate work can't just wait for pledges made long ago to come true," she asserted.

The minister also reminded that the conservation and protection of flagship species also involve law enforcement efforts, which the Indonesian state budget must always be ready to back.

As for meeting Indonesia's 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target, Minister Nurbaya reiterated that the government still relies on its own state budget because the climate target is legally binding.

"We still depend on the state budget for law enforcement and other conservation and protection efforts for our flagship species alike, as well as for our FOLU-related climate work,” she underlined.

She restated that Indonesia is not willing to gamble with time by waiting for the long-anticipated enhanced climate finance from developed countries.

"Indonesia, as President Jokowi has told us several times, should not waste time waiting for enhanced climate finance support from international parties given the uncertainties involved. In addition, the President has repeatedly said that climate collaborations with any other country must not lead to Indonesia having its climate positions dictated," she affirmed.

Minister Nurbaya wrapped up the last session of the policy discussion by pointing out once again that Indonesia continues to prioritize fulfilling its legally binding climate targets with the country's own resources, including ensuring ongoing conservation and protection efforts aimed at its flagship species, which constitutes one of the packages in the country’s 2030 FoLU net carbon sink target.

At the kick-off to the G20 1st Environment Deputies Meeting and Climate Sustainability Working Group Meeting, as recently reported by FORESTHINTS.NEWS (Mar 2), Minister Nurbaya underscored two core themes of Indonesia’s climate action - forest and land use & energy transition - which are at the heart of President Joko Widodo’s current climate leadership. In terms of energy transition, an annual USD100 billion climate finance promise from developed countries - as pledged years ago - is still undelivered.


TAGS: ORANGUTAN , 2030 FOLU , CLIMATE

RELATED STORIES


POLICY

Minister: Orangutan protection incorporated into Indonesia’s FOLU climate target
March 10, 2022

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya has reiterated that ongoing and consistent conservation and protection efforts focused on Indonesia's flagship species, including the Sumatran, Tapanuli and Bornean orangutans, form part of the packages in the country's 2030 Forestry and Other Land Use (FOLU) net carbon sink target.

President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo and Minister Nurbaya brought Indonesia’s legally-binding climate targets to last year’s COP26 summit, including the 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target which aligns with the pledge made by world leaders at the 2021 UN climate summit.

The Indonesia’s FOLU climate target is equivalent to global efforts to achieve net zero deforestation by 2030.

"Our 2030 FoLU net carbon sink target serves as a large umbrella for the forestry and land use sector, while conservation and protection efforts for flagship species across the islands of Sumatra, Kalimantan and Java are among the packages in the FoLU climate target," said Minister Nurbaya in a policy discussion regarding the clear links between Indonesia's FoLU climate target and its flagship species conservation strategy (Mar 8).

“Don’t forget that the Indonesian state budget apportions over USD300 million annually for our climate efforts, which are linked, among other things, to meeting the 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target while, in parallel, making sure of the ongoing conservation and protection of our flagship species, especially on the ground level," she explained.

The minister also re-emphasized that Indonesia remains extremely optimistic and confident about ensuring the conservation and protection of its flagship species.

“Threats to flagship species of course still exist, so our efforts are directed at keeping these threats at a very low risk level so that the major habitats of our flagship species continue to allow their populations to thrive,” she stressed.

Indonesia is second to none as the home of numerous flagships species, whose conservation and protection continue to be prioritized during the global pandemic by the country's forestry authorities, both through satellite monitoring and ground-based efforts, as reported by FORESTHINTS.NEWS in late November last year.

The recent photos below depict wild Bornean orangutans, one of Indonesia's flagship species, populations of which are spread across conservation areas and protection forests, as well as in production forests (logging, pulpwood and ecosystem restoration concessions), including HCV areas that lie in palm oil concessions. Indonesia is home to both the largest habitat area and population of Bornean orangutans in the world.





Own resources

Minister Nurbaya said despite the fact that the climate finance pledge of USD100 billion a year which was promised years ago by developed countries has never come to fruition, Indonesia’s climate efforts continue unabated, encompassing wide-ranging endeavours to conserve and protect the country’s various flagship species.

"Over USD300 million a year from our own state budget is allocated to our FOLU climate efforts, including the conservation and protection of flagship species. That's not just a pledge or promise," she stated.

“Without our own budget power, of course we wouldn’t be able to work seriously in reaching our climate targets, including persevering with conservation and protection efforts to the benefit of the flagship species. Our climate work can't just wait for pledges made long ago to come true," she asserted.

The minister also reminded that the conservation and protection of flagship species also involve law enforcement efforts, which the Indonesian state budget must always be ready to back.

As for meeting Indonesia's 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target, Minister Nurbaya reiterated that the government still relies on its own state budget because the climate target is legally binding.

"We still depend on the state budget for law enforcement and other conservation and protection efforts for our flagship species alike, as well as for our FOLU-related climate work,” she underlined.

She restated that Indonesia is not willing to gamble with time by waiting for the long-anticipated enhanced climate finance from developed countries.

"Indonesia, as President Jokowi has told us several times, should not waste time waiting for enhanced climate finance support from international parties given the uncertainties involved. In addition, the President has repeatedly said that climate collaborations with any other country must not lead to Indonesia having its climate positions dictated," she affirmed.

Minister Nurbaya wrapped up the last session of the policy discussion by pointing out once again that Indonesia continues to prioritize fulfilling its legally binding climate targets with the country's own resources, including ensuring ongoing conservation and protection efforts aimed at its flagship species, which constitutes one of the packages in the country’s 2030 FOLU net carbon sink target.

At the kick-off to the G20 1st Environment Deputies Meeting and Climate Sustainability Working Group Meeting, as recently reported by FORESTHINTS.NEWS (Mar 2), Minister Nurbaya underscored two core themes of Indonesia’s climate action - forest and land use & energy transition - which are at the heart of President Joko Widodo’s current climate leadership. In terms of energy transition, an annual USD100 billion climate finance promise from developed countries - as pledged years ago - is still undelivered.


TAGS: ORANGUTAN , 2030 FOLU , CLIMATE

RELATED STORIES