POLICY

Minister: Indonesia on track, optimistic about protecting Sumatran elephants
August 12, 2021

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JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - One of the strengths of President Joko Widodo's permanent moratorium on the conversion of primary forests and peatlands - spanning an area larger than the UK and Norway combined - is that it covers a substantial level of flagship species’ habitat. One of these species is the Sumatran elephant.

To coincide with World Elephant Day today (Aug 12), Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya reiterated that the permanent moratorium map ensures that the populations of these flagship species, including the Sumatran elephant, continue to grow. 

According to data from the Indonesian forestry authorities, Sumatran elephant habitat incorporated within the permanent moratorium map amounts to more than two million hectares, equal to over 28.5 times the size of Singapore.

In addition to this level of coverage, the Sumatran elephant's habitat is also still spread among existing forestry and palm oil concessions, the minister explained, adding that these continue to play an important role as a home-range for the elephants.

Minister Nurbaya has made sure that the ground-based monitoring of flagship species will continue to be ongoing and uninterrupted, including for Sumatran elephants, during and after the pandemic.     

"With all our resources, we remain on track and optimistic about ensuring the protection and growth of our flagship species, including Sumatran elephants, despite the handicaps we face on the ground level," she said

The photo below, provided by the forestry authorities, shows an example of the ground-based monitoring of Sumatran elephants in a permanent moratorium spot in Sumatra’s Jambi province where some challenges and obstacles are encountered.


A million reasons

Minister Nurbaya emphasized that Indonesia, thanks largely to the permanent moratorium map, has a million reasons to be confident and optimistic about protecting its flagship species, and ensuring their populations continue to expand and thrive.

The minister believes that this confidence and optimism in dealing with all kinds of problems and challenges on the ground-level will continue to facilitate decision-making on the most feasible solutions.

This along with various other substantial ongoing efforts, she added, will ensure that there will be no extinction of the Sumatran elephant or any other flagship species.

“We have no doubt about this. We are completely optimistic about continuing to provide the best possible protection to our flagship species, including the Sumatran elephant,” enthused Minister Nurbaya. 

“Our work does not involve being pessimistic. According to all the available evidence, Indonesia is fully on track to be able to protect all its flagship species while also going ahead with the sustainable development of the forestry sector,” she said.

As previously reported by FORESTHINTS.NEWS to coincide with Global Tiger Day (Jul 29), evidence shows that up to 60%, or more than 8.15 million hectares - nearly double the size of Switzerland - of Sumatran tiger habitat falls under the permanent moratorium map, which is another reason for Indonesia to be optimistic.


TAGS: WORLD ELEPHANT DAY , SUMATRAN ELEPHANT , FLAGSHIP SPECIES

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POLICY

Minister: Indonesia on track, optimistic about protecting Sumatran elephants
August 12, 2021

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - One of the strengths of President Joko Widodo's permanent moratorium on the conversion of primary forests and peatlands - spanning an area larger than the UK and Norway combined - is that it covers a substantial level of flagship species’ habitat. One of these species is the Sumatran elephant.

To coincide with World Elephant Day today (Aug 12), Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya reiterated that the permanent moratorium map ensures that the populations of these flagship species, including the Sumatran elephant, continue to grow. 

According to data from the Indonesian forestry authorities, Sumatran elephant habitat incorporated within the permanent moratorium map amounts to more than two million hectares, equal to over 28.5 times the size of Singapore.

In addition to this level of coverage, the Sumatran elephant's habitat is also still spread among existing forestry and palm oil concessions, the minister explained, adding that these continue to play an important role as a home-range for the elephants.

Minister Nurbaya has made sure that the ground-based monitoring of flagship species will continue to be ongoing and uninterrupted, including for Sumatran elephants, during and after the pandemic.     

"With all our resources, we remain on track and optimistic about ensuring the protection and growth of our flagship species, including Sumatran elephants, despite the handicaps we face on the ground level," she said

The photo below, provided by the forestry authorities, shows an example of the ground-based monitoring of Sumatran elephants in a permanent moratorium spot in Sumatra’s Jambi province where some challenges and obstacles are encountered.


A million reasons

Minister Nurbaya emphasized that Indonesia, thanks largely to the permanent moratorium map, has a million reasons to be confident and optimistic about protecting its flagship species, and ensuring their populations continue to expand and thrive.

The minister believes that this confidence and optimism in dealing with all kinds of problems and challenges on the ground-level will continue to facilitate decision-making on the most feasible solutions.

This along with various other substantial ongoing efforts, she added, will ensure that there will be no extinction of the Sumatran elephant or any other flagship species.

“We have no doubt about this. We are completely optimistic about continuing to provide the best possible protection to our flagship species, including the Sumatran elephant,” enthused Minister Nurbaya. 

“Our work does not involve being pessimistic. According to all the available evidence, Indonesia is fully on track to be able to protect all its flagship species while also going ahead with the sustainable development of the forestry sector,” she said.

As previously reported by FORESTHINTS.NEWS to coincide with Global Tiger Day (Jul 29), evidence shows that up to 60%, or more than 8.15 million hectares - nearly double the size of Switzerland - of Sumatran tiger habitat falls under the permanent moratorium map, which is another reason for Indonesia to be optimistic.


TAGS: WORLD ELEPHANT DAY , SUMATRAN ELEPHANT , FLAGSHIP SPECIES

RELATED STORIES