POLICY

Minister delivers widescale conservation wins in two forest-rich provinces
September 28, 2020

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya has pointed out that a significant extent of the permanent moratorium map encompasses primary forests and peatlands set aside for protection purposes in the provinces of Papua and West Papua. 

Referring to the latest data from the permanent moratorium map, Minister Nurbaya explained that more than 25.63 million hectares of primary forests and peatlands in the two provinces - an area bigger than the UK - form part of this map.

“More than 66% of the total area of Papua province is included in the permanent moratorium map,” Minister Nurbaya said in a virtual discussion (Sep 28) which raised the issue of the extent to which primary forests and peatlands in Papua and West Papua provinces are being protected, in particular under her authority. 

“Meanwhile, over 40% of the total area of West Papua province forms part of the permanent moratorium map,” she said.

The permanent moratorium on the development of primary forests and peatlands was signed by President Joko Widodo in early August last year. It covers an area in excess of 66 million hectares - larger than France or more than double the size of the UK.

"The primary forests and peatlands in the two provinces on the island of Papua which are included in the permanent moratorium map contribute greatly to the total nationwide permanent moratorium map, accounting for almost 39%," Minister Nurbaya explained.

She also stressed that the permanent moratorium areas lying in the two forest-rich provinces are not only dominated by conservation areas and protection forests, but also include significant production forests - all of which constitute state forest areas that are legally under her power.

"The state forest areas included in the permanent moratorium map in the two provinces encompass an area of 25.37 million hectares, or 99% of the total," she said. 

She also pointed out that there are also relatively small portions of non-state forest areas (APL) within the permanent moratorium map in the two provinces, covering an area of more than 230 thousand hectares or three times the size of Singapore, which are under the control of local government authorities.

Minister Nurbaya used the following graphs to compare the extent of permanent moratorium areas in Papua and West Papua provinces (graphs 1 and 2), along with graph 3 which shows the combined extent of permanent moratorium areas in the two provinces.





Nearly double the Netherlands

Minister Nurbaya went on to detail the extent of the production forests - consisting of permanent and convertible production forests (HP/HPT/HPK) - within the permanent moratorium map in Papua and West Papua provinces.

According to her, these forests are comprised of more than 8 million hectares, or almost twice the size of the Netherlands.

"Of the permanent and convertible production forests included in the permanent moratorium in the two provinces, more than 22% is made up of forested peatlands and the majority are primary forests," she asserted.

Permanent production forests (HP/HPT), she continued, account for an area of more than 6 million hectares, equivalent to nearly 1.5 times the area of the Netherlands, in which the granting of logging permits would be legally permitted if the permanent moratorium were not in place.

"Thanks to the permanent moratorium map, these HP/HPT forests are protected rather than allocated for logging, because they form part of the Papua and West Papua moratorium map," Minister Nurbaya elaborated.

The Google Earth images below, presented by Minister Nurbaya, depict examples of the permanent production forests being protected under the permanent moratorium map. 



Apart from the permanent production forests, Minister Nurbaya said that two million hectares of convertible production forests (HPK) also form part of the permanent moratorium map in the two provinces.

"Legally these convertible production forests are allowed to be cleared, but they also continue to be protected by the permanent moratorium. This applies not only to primary forests within these areas but also to forested peatlands," she explained.

The following Google Earth images from Minister Nurbaya portray parts of the two million hectares of the convertible production forests, equivalent to more than 27 times the size of Singapore, that have escaped clearing thanks to the protection afforded by the permanent moratorium.



HCV potential areas for conservation in palm oil concessions

In addition to production forest areas that are protected at such a significant level, Minister Nurbaya also described the efforts underway to protect HCV potential areas - areas with good forest cover - which are still widespread in existing palm oil concessions in Papua and West Papua provinces.

These moves, which were previously reported on by FORESTHINTS.NEWS (May 11), are being carried out in substantial remaining areas with good forest cover in existing palm oil concessions in the two provinces, permits for which were obtained from the relinquishment of state forest areas.

"These efforts are part of the implementation of President Joko Widodo's palm oil moratorium order. Next month, I will deliver the detailed figures regarding the huge level of remaining areas with good forest cover in existing palm oil concessions in Papua and West Papua provinces," the minister confirmed.

In closing, she expressed her optimism, based on evidence, which takes into account the level of the permanent moratorium map, the significant parts of forestry concessions that have been set aside for conservation purposes, including ecosystem restoration concessions, as well as the remaining good forest cover in existing palm oil concessions. 

"By observing the aforementioned matters, Indonesia continues to remain on track, as much as possible, when it comes to protecting more forests, more peatlands and more mangroves amid various development programs. The corridor is clear - namely reduced deforestation at a relatively decreasing level, not zero deforestation,” Minister Nurbaya emphasized.


TAGS: MORATORIUM , PRIMARY FOREST , PEATLANDS

RELATED STORIES


POLICY

Minister delivers widescale conservation wins in two forest-rich provinces
September 28, 2020

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya has pointed out that a significant extent of the permanent moratorium map encompasses primary forests and peatlands set aside for protection purposes in the provinces of Papua and West Papua. 

Referring to the latest data from the permanent moratorium map, Minister Nurbaya explained that more than 25.63 million hectares of primary forests and peatlands in the two provinces - an area bigger than the UK - form part of this map.

“More than 66% of the total area of Papua province is included in the permanent moratorium map,” Minister Nurbaya said in a virtual discussion (Sep 28) which raised the issue of the extent to which primary forests and peatlands in Papua and West Papua provinces are being protected, in particular under her authority. 

“Meanwhile, over 40% of the total area of West Papua province forms part of the permanent moratorium map,” she said.

The permanent moratorium on the development of primary forests and peatlands was signed by President Joko Widodo in early August last year. It covers an area in excess of 66 million hectares - larger than France or more than double the size of the UK.

"The primary forests and peatlands in the two provinces on the island of Papua which are included in the permanent moratorium map contribute greatly to the total nationwide permanent moratorium map, accounting for almost 39%," Minister Nurbaya explained.

She also stressed that the permanent moratorium areas lying in the two forest-rich provinces are not only dominated by conservation areas and protection forests, but also include significant production forests - all of which constitute state forest areas that are legally under her power.

"The state forest areas included in the permanent moratorium map in the two provinces encompass an area of 25.37 million hectares, or 99% of the total," she said. 

She also pointed out that there are also relatively small portions of non-state forest areas (APL) within the permanent moratorium map in the two provinces, covering an area of more than 230 thousand hectares or three times the size of Singapore, which are under the control of local government authorities.

Minister Nurbaya used the following graphs to compare the extent of permanent moratorium areas in Papua and West Papua provinces (graphs 1 and 2), along with graph 3 which shows the combined extent of permanent moratorium areas in the two provinces.





Nearly double the Netherlands

Minister Nurbaya went on to detail the extent of the production forests - consisting of permanent and convertible production forests (HP/HPT/HPK) - within the permanent moratorium map in Papua and West Papua provinces.

According to her, these forests are comprised of more than 8 million hectares, or almost twice the size of the Netherlands.

"Of the permanent and convertible production forests included in the permanent moratorium in the two provinces, more than 22% is made up of forested peatlands and the majority are primary forests," she asserted.

Permanent production forests (HP/HPT), she continued, account for an area of more than 6 million hectares, equivalent to nearly 1.5 times the area of the Netherlands, in which the granting of logging permits would be legally permitted if the permanent moratorium were not in place.

"Thanks to the permanent moratorium map, these HP/HPT forests are protected rather than allocated for logging, because they form part of the Papua and West Papua moratorium map," Minister Nurbaya elaborated.

The Google Earth images below, presented by Minister Nurbaya, depict examples of the permanent production forests being protected under the permanent moratorium map. 



Apart from the permanent production forests, Minister Nurbaya said that two million hectares of convertible production forests (HPK) also form part of the permanent moratorium map in the two provinces.

"Legally these convertible production forests are allowed to be cleared, but they also continue to be protected by the permanent moratorium. This applies not only to primary forests within these areas but also to forested peatlands," she explained.

The following Google Earth images from Minister Nurbaya portray parts of the two million hectares of the convertible production forests, equivalent to more than 27 times the size of Singapore, that have escaped clearing thanks to the protection afforded by the permanent moratorium.



HCV potential areas for conservation in palm oil concessions

In addition to production forest areas that are protected at such a significant level, Minister Nurbaya also described the efforts underway to protect HCV potential areas - areas with good forest cover - which are still widespread in existing palm oil concessions in Papua and West Papua provinces.

These moves, which were previously reported on by FORESTHINTS.NEWS (May 11), are being carried out in substantial remaining areas with good forest cover in existing palm oil concessions in the two provinces, permits for which were obtained from the relinquishment of state forest areas.

"These efforts are part of the implementation of President Joko Widodo's palm oil moratorium order. Next month, I will deliver the detailed figures regarding the huge level of remaining areas with good forest cover in existing palm oil concessions in Papua and West Papua provinces," the minister confirmed.

In closing, she expressed her optimism, based on evidence, which takes into account the level of the permanent moratorium map, the significant parts of forestry concessions that have been set aside for conservation purposes, including ecosystem restoration concessions, as well as the remaining good forest cover in existing palm oil concessions. 

"By observing the aforementioned matters, Indonesia continues to remain on track, as much as possible, when it comes to protecting more forests, more peatlands and more mangroves amid various development programs. The corridor is clear - namely reduced deforestation at a relatively decreasing level, not zero deforestation,” Minister Nurbaya emphasized.


TAGS: MORATORIUM , PRIMARY FOREST , PEATLANDS

RELATED STORIES