POLICY

Doubling of Sumatran tiger population as part of enhanced climate action
July 29, 2021

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JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - As we mark Global Tiger Day today, it is worth remembering President Joko Widodo’s momentous signing of a permanent moratorium on the conversion of primary forest and peatland in August 2019. This sought, among many other things, to ensure the widespread protection of Sumatran tiger habitat.

The area encompassed by the permanent moratorium map exceeds that of Norway and the UK combined, as emphasized by President Widodo at the Leaders Summit on Climate Change hosted by US President Joe Biden to coincide with Earth Day this year.

The moratorium map demonstrates the power of the moratorium by covering up to 60% of the Sumatran tiger's habitat, amounting to over 8.15 million hectares or nearly double the size of Switzerland.

Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya reaffirmed the strength of the permanent moratorium in protecting multiple flagship species, among them the Sumatran tiger, at a recent ministerial meeting involving countries with significant forested areas, hosted by UK Environment Secretary George Eustice ahead of COP26 (Jul 27).

During this ministerial meeting, Minister Nubaya stated that the permanent moratorium stands at the forefront of Indonesia’s enhanced conservation efforts, playing a pivotal role simultaneously as home to multiple flagship species and in lowering emissions.

She also declared Indonesia’s forestry and land use (FoLU) 2030 net carbon sink target at a prior ministerial meeting hosted by COP26 President Alok Sharma (Jul 25-26), stressing that the permanent moratorium map is the foremost instrument for ensuring the country remains on a convincing path to achieving the target.

The Indonesian government’s enhanced ambitions to meet this target further reinforce the remarkable level of long-term protection provided to flagship species, including the Sumatran tiger, living inside the permanent moratorium areas.

For example, over 74% of the Leuser Ecosystem – equivalent to over 26 times the size of Singapore - is covered by the permanent moratorium map. The Leuser Ecosystem is the only place on earth where Sumatran tigers, orangutans, elephants and rhinos coexist in a single, huge ecosystem.

Efforts to double Sumatran tiger population


Minister Siti Nurbaya has on numerous occasions asserted that the Sumatran tiger, as well as other flagship species, will never become extinct in Indonesia.

She has also repeatedly pointed out that, outside of the permanent moratorium map, Sumatran tiger habitats are in fact scattered among existing forestry concessions, most notably in logging, pulpwood and ecosystem restoration concessions, as well as palm oil concessions.

The Sumatran tiger habitat within the permanent moratorium map is still significantly composed of forested areas including dry, peat and mangrove forests spread across both highland and lowland landscapes. Forested Sumatran tiger habitat has been proven to play a very substantial role in carbon sequestration and storage.

In line with this, Minister Nurbaya has often underscored the economic value of carbon from forested areas which are home to flagship species, including the Sumatran tiger, insisting it should be given the highest possible price tag.

Considering all the traceable evidence-based data pertaining to Sumatran tiger habitat, Minister Nurbaya is targeting a doubling of this flagship species' population, utilizing both the strong protections afforded by the permanent moratorium map as well as the distribution of the species’ habitat outside the permanent moratorium map among existing forestry and palm oil concessions.

According to data from the Indonesian Environment and Forestry Ministry, the Sumatran tiger population is estimated at around 600. However, the ministry is aiming for a twofold increase in the population of this critically-endangered species.

It is increasingly clear that Indonesia's target of achieving FoLU net carbon sink by 2030 is also reinforcing ground efforts aimed at meeting the country's target of doubling the Sumatran tiger population.

Enhanced ambitions for climate actions must also be matched by enhanced ambitions for the long-term protection of the Sumatran tiger and other multiple flagship species and their habitats. Indonesia is already on the right track in this regard.


TAGS: GLOBAL TIGER DAY , SUMATRAN TIGER , PERMANENT MORATORIUM

RELATED STORIES


POLICY

Doubling of Sumatran tiger population as part of enhanced climate action
July 29, 2021

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - As we mark Global Tiger Day today, it is worth remembering President Joko Widodo’s momentous signing of a permanent moratorium on the conversion of primary forest and peatland in August 2019. This sought, among many other things, to ensure the widespread protection of Sumatran tiger habitat.

The area encompassed by the permanent moratorium map exceeds that of Norway and the UK combined, as emphasized by President Widodo at the Leaders Summit on Climate Change hosted by US President Joe Biden to coincide with Earth Day this year.

The moratorium map demonstrates the power of the moratorium by covering up to 60% of the Sumatran tiger's habitat, amounting to over 8.15 million hectares or nearly double the size of Switzerland.

Indonesian Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya reaffirmed the strength of the permanent moratorium in protecting multiple flagship species, among them the Sumatran tiger, at a recent ministerial meeting involving countries with significant forested areas, hosted by UK Environment Secretary George Eustice ahead of COP26 (Jul 27).

During this ministerial meeting, Minister Nubaya stated that the permanent moratorium stands at the forefront of Indonesia’s enhanced conservation efforts, playing a pivotal role simultaneously as home to multiple flagship species and in lowering emissions.

She also declared Indonesia’s forestry and land use (FoLU) 2030 net carbon sink target at a prior ministerial meeting hosted by COP26 President Alok Sharma (Jul 25-26), stressing that the permanent moratorium map is the foremost instrument for ensuring the country remains on a convincing path to achieving the target.

The Indonesian government’s enhanced ambitions to meet this target further reinforce the remarkable level of long-term protection provided to flagship species, including the Sumatran tiger, living inside the permanent moratorium areas.

For example, over 74% of the Leuser Ecosystem – equivalent to over 26 times the size of Singapore - is covered by the permanent moratorium map. The Leuser Ecosystem is the only place on earth where Sumatran tigers, orangutans, elephants and rhinos coexist in a single, huge ecosystem.

Efforts to double Sumatran tiger population


Minister Siti Nurbaya has on numerous occasions asserted that the Sumatran tiger, as well as other flagship species, will never become extinct in Indonesia.

She has also repeatedly pointed out that, outside of the permanent moratorium map, Sumatran tiger habitats are in fact scattered among existing forestry concessions, most notably in logging, pulpwood and ecosystem restoration concessions, as well as palm oil concessions.

The Sumatran tiger habitat within the permanent moratorium map is still significantly composed of forested areas including dry, peat and mangrove forests spread across both highland and lowland landscapes. Forested Sumatran tiger habitat has been proven to play a very substantial role in carbon sequestration and storage.

In line with this, Minister Nurbaya has often underscored the economic value of carbon from forested areas which are home to flagship species, including the Sumatran tiger, insisting it should be given the highest possible price tag.

Considering all the traceable evidence-based data pertaining to Sumatran tiger habitat, Minister Nurbaya is targeting a doubling of this flagship species' population, utilizing both the strong protections afforded by the permanent moratorium map as well as the distribution of the species’ habitat outside the permanent moratorium map among existing forestry and palm oil concessions.

According to data from the Indonesian Environment and Forestry Ministry, the Sumatran tiger population is estimated at around 600. However, the ministry is aiming for a twofold increase in the population of this critically-endangered species.

It is increasingly clear that Indonesia's target of achieving FoLU net carbon sink by 2030 is also reinforcing ground efforts aimed at meeting the country's target of doubling the Sumatran tiger population.

Enhanced ambitions for climate actions must also be matched by enhanced ambitions for the long-term protection of the Sumatran tiger and other multiple flagship species and their habitats. Indonesia is already on the right track in this regard.


TAGS: GLOBAL TIGER DAY , SUMATRAN TIGER , PERMANENT MORATORIUM

RELATED STORIES