POLICY

COP27: Indonesia considering joining newly-launched FCLP
November 8, 2022

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JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesia, one of the world’s most richly tropical forested countries and home to various key wildlife species, is considering whether to join the Forests and Climate Leaders' Partnership (FCLP) and become a member of its steering committee, according to the FCLP's launch statement at the COP27 Summit (Nov 7).

Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Minister Professor Siti Nurbaya confirmed her country’s new stance at the Sharm El-Sheikh International Convention Center in Egypt, saying that deliberations were underway aimed at possibly becoming a member of the FCLP, in the wake of Indonesia signing of bilateral climate partnerships with the US, Norway and the UK to support Indonesia's Forestry and Other Land Use (FOLU) Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan.

The Minister expressed her respect for the speed with which Norway acted to deliver its first results-based contribution of USD 56 million through the Indonesian Environmental Fund Management Agency (BPDLH), just ten days after the two countries had signed the contribution agreement.

“I recently reported in-person to President Joko Widodo regarding the first results-based contribution from Norway, and the President again emphasized that we should continue to focus on supporting our FOLU Net Sink 2030 target by prioritizing local and adat community-based efforts underpinned by concrete ground-based performance measures,” she said.

“We had many wide-ranging discussions with Minister Espen Barth Eide (Norwegian Minister for Climate and Environment) during his visit to Jakarta and East Kalimantan. We agree that fact-based evidence is to be used in the decision-making process in our climate collaboration," Minister Nurbaya added.

The Minister also praised the efforts of US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate (SPEC) John Kerry and his team for remaining consistently engaged in technical communications about the FCLP with Indonesia, through both formal and informal pathways.

“The technical communications we conducted with SPEC Kerry and his team paved the way for us to envisage joining the FCLP, with the main consideration being the potential mobilization of affordable efforts aimed at even greater collective climate action from the FOLU sector to meet the ultimate goal of 1.5 (degree temperature increase),” she elaborated.

According to the Minister, another factor that prompted her to consider joining the FCLP was last month’s signing of a bilateral climate partnership with the UK and the accompanying rigorous dialogues she held with UK Minister Lord Zac Goldsmith, both in Jakarta and Bali.

“I would like to say a huge thank you to Minister Goldsmith for the in-depth discussions we enjoyed during his visit to Indonesia, especially regarding the FCLP, as well as his written offer for Indonesia to become a member of the FCLP’s steering committee which, of course, I’m giving great consideration to,” the Minister said.

Momentum for stronger implementation

During an event at the Indonesian Pavilion at COP27, Minister Nurbaya said that the climate partnerships with the US, Norway and the UK for Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030 were not merely engineered but involved an arduous process.

“It’s just as the old saying goes – there is no rose without a thorn,” she said.

“To support Indonesia in its climate efforts to reduce emissions, of course bilateral partnerships with various leading countries need to prioritize supporting a stronger implementation of our FOLU Net Sink 2030 because of its role in reducing our GHG emissions by around 60%,” the Minister asserted.

“Backing our FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan is a major climate action, not only for Indonesia, but also in terms of the positive impact it will have on our collective actions in addressing the global climate crisis," she stressed.

Proven track record

Indonesia has a proven track record under President Widodo's administration, recording the lowest deforestation rates over the past two decades and achieving three consecutive years with no substantial haze-causing fires during the global pandemic, in stark contrast to the experiences of the US, Canada, Australia, Russia, many countries in Europe, as well as those in the Amazon region.

Indonesia has standing tropical forests spanning more than 90 million hectares - roughly four times the size of the UK – which are not only a key determinant in the country achieving a net sink by 2030, but also serve as conservation, protection and production landscapes, including for social forestry.

Moreover, Indonesia boasts a level of wildlife comprehensiveness unrivalled by anywhere else on earth.

The Sumatran forests of Southeast Asia’s largest country are home to two distinct species of orangutans, tigers, elephants and rhinos, while the forests of Kalimantan are inhabited by the world’s largest population of Bornean orangutans.

Meanwhile, Java’s Ujung Kulon National Park plays host to Javan Rhinos, another key wildlife species whose population continues to grow in line with the frequent announcement of the birth of new calves.

Minister Nurbaya reiterated that supporting Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan will not only facilitate the country in reducing its GHG emissions by almost 60%, but also contribute to the conservation and protection of the aforementioned key wildlife species and many others.

What's next?

Minister Nurbaya pointed out that any decision on whether to join the FCLP would depend on ensuring a solid alignment between the new partnership and Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030.

“If we were to decide to join the FCLP, it would mean that we have to make sure that the FCLP is one of the main drivers in achieving a stronger implementation of our FOLU Net Sink 2030 climate goals, not the other way around," she said.

"Our decision will come down to our own considerations, based on the extent to which the FCLP will truly be part of boosting our efforts to achieve the climate goals as set out in our FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan," the Minister added.

She said that Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan is all about ground-level implementation and all the measures this encompasses. "We are talking about climate action on the ground in the FOLU sector, not just setting targets on paper," she asserted.

Minister Nurbaya went on to reiterate President Widodo's message that Indonesia does not need too many narratives, because the most important thing is delivering concrete actions and leading by example on the ground level.

“It goes without saying that if Indonesia decides to join the FCLP and become a member of its SC, then we must ensure that the FCLP is productive with regard to Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030," the Minister said in conclusion.


TAGS: COP27 , FCLP , FOLU NET SINK 2030

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POLICY

COP27: Indonesia considering joining newly-launched FCLP
November 8, 2022

facebookfinal.png wafinal.png twitterfinal.png emailfinal.png

JAKARTA (FORESTHINTS.NEWS) - Indonesia, one of the world’s most richly tropical forested countries and home to various key wildlife species, is considering whether to join the Forests and Climate Leaders' Partnership (FCLP) and become a member of its steering committee, according to the FCLP's launch statement at the COP27 Summit (Nov 7).

Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Minister Professor Siti Nurbaya confirmed her country’s new stance at the Sharm El-Sheikh International Convention Center in Egypt, saying that deliberations were underway aimed at possibly becoming a member of the FCLP, in the wake of Indonesia signing of bilateral climate partnerships with the US, Norway and the UK to support Indonesia's Forestry and Other Land Use (FOLU) Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan.

The Minister expressed her respect for the speed with which Norway acted to deliver its first results-based contribution of USD 56 million through the Indonesian Environmental Fund Management Agency (BPDLH), just ten days after the two countries had signed the contribution agreement.

“I recently reported in-person to President Joko Widodo regarding the first results-based contribution from Norway, and the President again emphasized that we should continue to focus on supporting our FOLU Net Sink 2030 target by prioritizing local and adat community-based efforts underpinned by concrete ground-based performance measures,” she said.

“We had many wide-ranging discussions with Minister Espen Barth Eide (Norwegian Minister for Climate and Environment) during his visit to Jakarta and East Kalimantan. We agree that fact-based evidence is to be used in the decision-making process in our climate collaboration," Minister Nurbaya added.

The Minister also praised the efforts of US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate (SPEC) John Kerry and his team for remaining consistently engaged in technical communications about the FCLP with Indonesia, through both formal and informal pathways.

“The technical communications we conducted with SPEC Kerry and his team paved the way for us to envisage joining the FCLP, with the main consideration being the potential mobilization of affordable efforts aimed at even greater collective climate action from the FOLU sector to meet the ultimate goal of 1.5 (degree temperature increase),” she elaborated.

According to the Minister, another factor that prompted her to consider joining the FCLP was last month’s signing of a bilateral climate partnership with the UK and the accompanying rigorous dialogues she held with UK Minister Lord Zac Goldsmith, both in Jakarta and Bali.

“I would like to say a huge thank you to Minister Goldsmith for the in-depth discussions we enjoyed during his visit to Indonesia, especially regarding the FCLP, as well as his written offer for Indonesia to become a member of the FCLP’s steering committee which, of course, I’m giving great consideration to,” the Minister said.

Momentum for stronger implementation

During an event at the Indonesian Pavilion at COP27, Minister Nurbaya said that the climate partnerships with the US, Norway and the UK for Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030 were not merely engineered but involved an arduous process.

“It’s just as the old saying goes – there is no rose without a thorn,” she said.

“To support Indonesia in its climate efforts to reduce emissions, of course bilateral partnerships with various leading countries need to prioritize supporting a stronger implementation of our FOLU Net Sink 2030 because of its role in reducing our GHG emissions by around 60%,” the Minister asserted.

“Backing our FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan is a major climate action, not only for Indonesia, but also in terms of the positive impact it will have on our collective actions in addressing the global climate crisis," she stressed.

Proven track record

Indonesia has a proven track record under President Widodo's administration, recording the lowest deforestation rates over the past two decades and achieving three consecutive years with no substantial haze-causing fires during the global pandemic, in stark contrast to the experiences of the US, Canada, Australia, Russia, many countries in Europe, as well as those in the Amazon region.

Indonesia has standing tropical forests spanning more than 90 million hectares - roughly four times the size of the UK – which are not only a key determinant in the country achieving a net sink by 2030, but also serve as conservation, protection and production landscapes, including for social forestry.

Moreover, Indonesia boasts a level of wildlife comprehensiveness unrivalled by anywhere else on earth.

The Sumatran forests of Southeast Asia’s largest country are home to two distinct species of orangutans, tigers, elephants and rhinos, while the forests of Kalimantan are inhabited by the world’s largest population of Bornean orangutans.

Meanwhile, Java’s Ujung Kulon National Park plays host to Javan Rhinos, another key wildlife species whose population continues to grow in line with the frequent announcement of the birth of new calves.

Minister Nurbaya reiterated that supporting Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan will not only facilitate the country in reducing its GHG emissions by almost 60%, but also contribute to the conservation and protection of the aforementioned key wildlife species and many others.

What's next?

Minister Nurbaya pointed out that any decision on whether to join the FCLP would depend on ensuring a solid alignment between the new partnership and Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030.

“If we were to decide to join the FCLP, it would mean that we have to make sure that the FCLP is one of the main drivers in achieving a stronger implementation of our FOLU Net Sink 2030 climate goals, not the other way around," she said.

"Our decision will come down to our own considerations, based on the extent to which the FCLP will truly be part of boosting our efforts to achieve the climate goals as set out in our FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan," the Minister added.

She said that Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030 Operational Plan is all about ground-level implementation and all the measures this encompasses. "We are talking about climate action on the ground in the FOLU sector, not just setting targets on paper," she asserted.

Minister Nurbaya went on to reiterate President Widodo's message that Indonesia does not need too many narratives, because the most important thing is delivering concrete actions and leading by example on the ground level.

“It goes without saying that if Indonesia decides to join the FCLP and become a member of its SC, then we must ensure that the FCLP is productive with regard to Indonesia's FOLU Net Sink 2030," the Minister said in conclusion.


TAGS: COP27 , FCLP , FOLU NET SINK 2030

RELATED STORIES